The Simple Things

Now through February, a new art exhibition will be on display in the Boundary Bistro, and we highly recommend checking it out. Stunning photography by couple, Cindy Holland and Michael Rhodes, now fills the walls of the bistro for customers to enjoy.252708_310113579082059_1095731843_n

Art exhibitions rotate through the Boundary Bay Bistro every couple of months, showcasing a mixture of artistic talents, perceptions and styles. Most of the artists who present their work in the Bistro are local folks from the PNW area. Besides transforming the bistro into a charming walk-through gallery, it allows these artists to connect and share their unique point of view with a revolving crowd of people. The artwork that hangs above each table often evokes dinnertime discussion, and sometimes might even tempt a one-of-a-kind purchase. Diners comment, that they enjoy walking through the gallery to view the different pieces that are displayed through the bistro. And when they come back for their next visit, a whole new selection of artwork will be there to enjoy…

cindy_holland Cindy’s passion for life is obvious in her photography; her work reflects the beauty found in simple things, capturing moments that are often imbued with a sense of enlightenment. She loves rocks and water, and the sensuousness of the unaltered, natural world. A walk on the beach often results in nearly a thousand photos, from wildlife to human smiles: everything has beauty! Michael’s passion stems from an entirely different form of inspiration, he likes old rusty things, evidence of times gone past, their remnants left for us to ponder over. He appreciates the well-loved look of older things, and loves to happen upon things left behind.

mike_rhodesBoth styles ring an underlying notion of embracing the little things, and you can see this in the striking imagery they’ve captured. Mike pays careful attention to things other people often overlook or ignore, and through his work, reminds us that some things should not be forgotten. A full-time student at WWU, a Swim Coach for the Bellingham Bay Swim Team and a Mom, in the off-chance Cindy takes time to get out, it is generally a whirlwind experience that renews her sense of awe and reverence for nature.

Through their picturesque images, this pair encourages appreciation towards the beauty of the little things in life. Next time you’re in the neighborhood, we encourage you to stop in and see for yourself.

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Salmon at The Bay

Salmon at the Bay is a fundraising event that features a salmon-inspired art show and a kick-off salmon bbq held at Boundary Bay Brewery every year forthe last six years. Salmon at the Bay is Northwest Salmon Enhancement Associations‘s largest fundraiser and all proceeds from the event go directly to funding streamside habitat restoration projects throughout Whatcom County.

This year’s theme was Common Waters: Connecting Salmon and People. One of the best things about Salmon at the Bay is the way this event really brings the community together and highlights the beauty of this unique and iconic species. Local artists were asked to create and donate salmon and water-inspired pieces of any medium to be displayed and sold gallery style at Boundary Bay through August 24th. This year more than 50 local artists, including featured artist Laurie Potter, donated their time, talents, and masterpieces to Salmon at the Bay. The vast majority of the participating artists live right here in Bellingham, and every artist resides in Whatcom County.  To see a slideshow of the art from this year (as well as the past two years!), click here.

People who are interested in supporting NSEA in our endeavors to restore sustainable wild salmon runs to Whatcom County can support NSEA in a variety of ways; by becoming an individual or business member of NSEA, by volunteering at a community stream restoration work party in the spring or fall, by adopting a restoration site to maintain with friends and family on a regular basis, by attending NSEA events, and by making lifestyle choices that minimize harmful impacts on local watersheds.

Salmon are a keystone species here in the Pacific Northwest and are an important indicator we have of the health of our coastal ecosystems. Salmon are extremely sensitive to changes in water quality, water quantity, and trophic webs. The more intact, diverse, and productive a freshwater ecosystem is, the healthier the salmon stocks will be. A decline in the ability of a stream or river to support the rearing of young salmon indicates a decline in the overall health of the ecosystem. Salmon carcasses provide rivers and streams with large amounts of marine-derived nutrients that feed aquatic insects, eagles, humans, and even the trees and shrubs growing along the banks. Timothy Egan wrote that, “the Pacific Northwest is any place a salmon can get to,” and I’m inclined to agree.

written by:
Lindsay Taylor
Volunteer Coordinator for NSEA